Wound Healing

Laser and LED therapies have been shown to accelerate wound healing. The mechanism is thought to involve improved blood circulation prompted by red or infrared light penetrating the wound or skin. These non-varying wavelengths are typically selected for their properties of NOT being absorbed by blood and other tissue in the skin.

The Rapid Discovery System opens new areas of wound study by providing wavelengths that are selectively absorbed by components in the blood, nerves, and skin. The new materials frequently become visible to the naked eyes during the first or second 2-minute treatment.

 Light from the Rapid Discovery System™ illuminates the wound area with continuously varying wavelengths. Fresh blood and other exudates become visible at some wavelengths and not others. This man had badly cracked skin on his toes. He touched a flap and it showed a tiny drop of blood. Treatment began and the blood flowed more quickly. The images reveal different details depending upon wavelength.

Light from the Rapid Discovery System™ illuminates the wound area with continuously varying wavelengths. Fresh blood and other exudates become visible at some wavelengths and not others. This man had badly cracked skin on his toes. He touched a flap and it showed a tiny drop of blood. Treatment began and the blood flowed more quickly. The images reveal different details depending upon wavelength.

 
 
 

This clip illustrates the visibility of the fresh blood at different wavelengths thanks to a handy smart phone.

 

Venous Stasis Ulcers

Venous stasis ulcers account for about 80% of lower extremity ulcerations. They are often recurrent and open ulcers can persist from weeks to many years. White light photography documents changes in color, texture, size, and shape.

 

PhotoMed’s tools reveal the restart of non-healing wounds

PhotoMed’s Rapid Discovery System prompts a restart of non-healing wounds. The changes within the wound become visible as the wavelength varies during therapy. At some wavelengths, our eyes easily detect changes during the first minutes of therapy that are initially too subtle to be recorded by standard color and monochrome cameras.

We focus on the first minutes because additional therapy may not be necessary. Typical treatment times total 4 to 6 minutes for moist wounds. Dry wounds generally take longer to observe changes and more dependent upon reports of sensations during treatment.

This venous stasis ulcer example shows visible changes during the first visit. The blue images shows the fresh red material as darker.

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This clip shows the proof-of-concept recording of the same wound during treatment. The camera was handheld which makes the image move around. Although the camera was not able to record fine details, the images confirmed that changes were occurring during the visit. This example, and others encouraged PhotoMed’s team to integrate a high-brightness range camera (6Mpx HDR mono) into the Rapid Discovery System.

Now available, the Rapid Discovery System™ offers a specialized camera (6 Mpx, HDR monochrome) to record early changes in wounds in real time. Later examination is simplified with synchronous playback of the special camera, the thermal imaging camera, web cam, sound, and information from the Vari-Chrome™ Pro.