Time for a new pain-relieving algorithm?

 
 
 

Millions of Americans thankfully maintain reduced pain through on-going interventions.

Guideline and protocols frequently limit the try something different escalation of interventions. Billions of dollars spent on managing chronic pain each year (= the U.S military budget), haven’t led to a way to end it.

What happens to the people who do not respond as expected?

 
 

 

Did Silicon Valley thinking partially break the treatment-resistant pain barrier?

As scientists and computer engineers, the current emphasis on “managing” pain didn’t make sense.

We wondered, how can pain ever end while interventions must remain active in the body to manage pain relief?


Maybe we should invent a new algorithm to address that problem?

 
 

How would a new algorithm work?

It would flexibly:

·      Apply the latest measuring, computing, and AI technologies (quantum computing?) to terminate pain

·      Provide the operator with actionable feedback - Did it work?

·      Converge on improving innate functions that continue after therapy ends. - Homeostasis?

 

The aim is simple. Prompt the body to return to normal. With normal returned, there are fewer reasons of pain.

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Does it work for real-world people?

Modern studies of pain management interventions typically exclude people not expected to get a “yes” answer for the hypothesis. Who will find solutions for the real-world people with treatment-resistant pain and functional impairments?

PhotoMed’s team developed its algorithm specifically for real-world people with a low probability of success. The team welcomed people for whom they thought the algorithm would NOT work. They were puzzled by the outcomes that frequently are not predicted in textbooks on pain or neuroscience. They recognized that “managing” pain doesn’t end it.

The team listened carefully to the comments made by people with astounding responses and outcomes. Patients with the dreaded CRPS (complex regional pain syndrome) frequently described their burning pain to be like the worst experience of holding ice. They described their responses as like “coldness leaving” before reporting that their hands or feet were warming.

Hands of a woman with CRPS warming after the application of PhotoMed’s algorithm to converge on solving the problem of painfully cold hands. She received three applications of light to achieve the desired outcome. The operator stopped therapy at minute 10 because the warming became apparent.

Hands of a woman with CRPS warming after the application of PhotoMed’s algorithm to converge on solving the problem of painfully cold hands. She received three applications of light to achieve the desired outcome. The operator stopped therapy at minute 10 because the warming became apparent.

Their comments led to a model that anyone can try in thought if not in actuality:

What happens when your plunge your hand into ice water?

What happens when you take it out?

What would it be like if any of the noxious experiences got stuck?

The ice water thought model let’s you experience the “symptoms” of myriad disorders. The symptoms and signs of disorders distill to innate sensory, motor, and skin temperature impairments. PhotoMed’s algorithm is that basic.

 

Selection Grid

 

Example 1

Roger (not his real name) had uncomfortably cold hands for 30 years. His co-workers complained when he upped the thermostat - in summer. After warming during 3 visits, he did not need to turn up the heat. This is what we mean by the return to normal function.

Problem: Many chronic disorders includes persistent abnormal skin temperatures

Input: The operator algorithmically selects the first treatment

Feedback: Warming acknowledges that the therapy worked

Outcome: Therapy can be stopped for the visit and may no longer be needed.

Lighter gray is warmer.

 
 
Figure 1  - Thermal imaging shows a warming response over a 15-minute period to a single stimulation by PhotoMed’s therapy. Lighter gray is warmer.

Figure 1 - Thermal imaging shows a warming response over a 15-minute period to a single stimulation by PhotoMed’s therapy. Lighter gray is warmer.

 
 
 
 

Automatically recorded data enables later examination by humans or AI.

Is the warming response normal, except for its years of delay?

 
 

Inputs, feedback, and outcomes?

PhotoMed’s algorithms adjust therapy to meet individual needs despite lack of previous beneficial outcomes. The algorithms employ iterative strategies that run 1000x faster than traditional escalation guidelines. The algorithm shares methods that are basic to many industries:

Identify problems: treatment-resistant pain and loss of normal functions

Test inputs: algorithmic adjustment of light wavelengths from PhotoMed’s device

Observe responses: a physiologic response confirms effects within 60 seconds

Measure outcomes: return of normal function - bug fixed?

Stop or iterate: if needed, test a different input.

You may be wondering, is it possible to return to normal function? No, about 2/3s of cases. We don’t know why.

The good news about the bad news is that, other than disappointment, there have been no side effects for hundreds of people.

The really good news is that 1/3 is a whole lot better than zero for people who previously endured treatment-resistant pain. Like everything in medicine, some achieve less surprising outcomes.

Why welcome hopeless cases?

Operators of PhotoMed’s new algorithm see things differently (like Schrödinger’s cat). See Example 1.

Most people do not have chronic pain.

Why does the body remain so long in an impaired state?

The different thinking leads down paths ignored by billions of research dollars. Testing aimed to learn which disorders might respond to the new algorithm. With no hypothesis, it was exciting like finding dinosaur bones before the first skeleton emerged. Today, the algorithm opens the possibility to reduce pain and impairment previously thought impossible.

 
 
Figure 2  - PhotoMed Technologies’ real-time algorithm addresses treatment-resistant pain and symptomatically impaired functions.

Figure 2 - PhotoMed Technologies’ real-time algorithm addresses treatment-resistant pain and symptomatically impaired functions.

 
 
 

Real-time feedback

PhotoMed Technologies’ team developed its Instant Feedback System for practitioners to prompt, observe, and collect details in Silicon Valley style.

PhotoMed’s algorithm lets computers, big data, and AI connect the dots among treatments, responses, and outcomes.

Feedback responses, if any, typically become measurable during or within 60 seconds after a therapy treatment ends.

Figure 3  - PhotoMed's Instant Feedback System™ documents events in real-time. Automation lets the practitioner focus on their patient while adjusting therapy. Thermal imaging and a 4k HDR camera record physiological responses appropriate to some disorders; coldness and non-healing wounds. Video records changes in sensation, movement, or coordination.

Figure 3 - PhotoMed's Instant Feedback System™ documents events in real-time. Automation lets the practitioner focus on their patient while adjusting therapy. Thermal imaging and a 4k HDR camera record physiological responses appropriate to some disorders; coldness and non-healing wounds. Video records changes in sensation, movement, or coordination.

The Vari-Chrome® Pro can be used independently from the Instant Feedback System™.

 
 

Which wavelengths would you like to select?

 
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The Vari-Chrome® Pro and the Instant Feedback System™ are available for rent or sale.


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