Time for a new pain-relieving algorithm?

 
 
 

Millions of Americans thankfully maintain reduced pain through on-going interventions.

Guideline and protocols frequently limit the try something different escalation of interventions

What happens to the people who do not respond as expected?

 
 
 
 

Did Silicon Valley thinking partially break the treatment-resistant pain barrier?

The AI revolution maintains Moore’s Law for continuously doubling computer capacity at half the cost every two years. New computing algorithms are routinely unearthing new cause/effects relationships.

Traditional medicine is practicing the reverse of Moore’s law. “Eroom’s law” observes that drug discovery is becoming slower and more expensive over time. In pain relief, runaway costs (= U.S. military budget and rising) only achieve an opioid epidemic, declining life expectancy, and little more pain relief.



As computer engineers, the current algorithm doesn’t make sense. How can pain ever end if the medications must remain active in the body to manage pain relief?


Maybe we should invent a new algorithm to address that problem?

 
 

How would a new algorithm work?

It would:

·      Apply the latest AI and computing technologies (quantum computing?) to terminate pain

·      Provide the operator with actionable feedback - Did it work?

·      Converge on improving functions that continue without the intervention - Homeostasis?

 
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Inputs, feedback, and outcomes?

Problems: treatment-resistant pain and loss of normal functions

Input: algorithmic adjustment of light wavelengths from PhotoMed’s device

Feedback: a physiologic response confirms effects within 60 seconds

Outcome: return of normal function - bug fixed?

 

For example, what happens to your cold and numb hands when you come indoors?

Example 1

Problem: Many chronic disorders includes persistent abnormal skin temperatures suitable for algorithmic feedback.

Input: The operator algorithmically adjusts the therapy based upon feedback during the visit.

Feedback: Warming identifies the body’s acknowledgement of the therapy.

Outcome: Therapy can be stopped for the visit or may no longer be needed.

Lighter gray is warmer.

 
 
Figure 1  - Thermal imaging shows a warming response over a 15-minute period to a single stimulation by PhotoMed’s therapy. Lighter gray is warmer.

Figure 1 - Thermal imaging shows a warming response over a 15-minute period to a single stimulation by PhotoMed’s therapy. Lighter gray is warmer.

 
 
 
 

Automatically recorded data enables later examination by humans or AI.

Is the warming response normal, except for its years of delay?

 
 

Why welcome hopeless cases?

Operators of PhotoMed’s new algorithm see things differently (like Schrödinger’s cat). See Example 1.

Most people do not have chronic pain.

Why does the body remain so long in an impaired state?

 
 
Figure 2  - PhotoMed Technologies’ real-time algorithm addresses treatment-resistant pain and symptomatically impaired functions.

Figure 2 - PhotoMed Technologies’ real-time algorithm addresses treatment-resistant pain and symptomatically impaired functions.

 
 
 

The bad news, PhotoMed’s algorithm doesn’t work in 2/3s of the treatment-resistant cases. However, beside disappointment, there are no side effects.

Two visits and 2 cents worth of electricity are enough to determine that the therapy probably won’t work for that patient.

The good news, improvement in 1/3 of the cases is whole lot better than zero.

Which disorders responded?

 

Real-time feedback

PhotoMed Technologies’ team developed its Instant Feedback System for practitioners to prompt, observe, and collect details in Silicon Valley style.

Let computers, big data, and AI connect the dots among treatments, responses, and outcomes. Feedback, usually no response, arrives in 60 seconds after therapy begins.

Figure 3  - PhotoMed's Instant Feedback System™ documents events in real-time. Automation lets the practitioner focus on their patient while adjusting therapy. Thermal imaging and a 4k HDR camera record physiological responses appropriate to some disorders; coldness and non-healing wounds. Video records changes in sensation, movement, or coordination.

Figure 3 - PhotoMed's Instant Feedback System™ documents events in real-time. Automation lets the practitioner focus on their patient while adjusting therapy. Thermal imaging and a 4k HDR camera record physiological responses appropriate to some disorders; coldness and non-healing wounds. Video records changes in sensation, movement, or coordination.

Responses, or lack of response, to varying wavelengths of light from the Vari-Chrome® Pro are recorded by the Instant Feedback System™.


The responses puzzled our anesthesiologist and neurologist advisors.

They asked, how could the therapy prompt so many seemingly different disorders to suddenly conclude?

We don’t have a clue. It just does.

 
 
 

Which wavelengths would you like to select?

 
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The Vari-Chrome® Pro and the Instant Feedback System™ are available for rent or sale.


Want to know more?