Time for a new pain-relieving algorithm?

 
 
 

Millions of Americans thankfully maintain reduced pain through on-going interventions.

Each specialist has their own professional perspective. Guidelines and protocols aren’t very flexible. Algorithms adapt to meet the patient’s needs.

It hurts to send a patient home underserved. Do you wish that you could improve the lives of one more person and their family each day?

What happens to people with pain that won’t quit?

 
 
 

Did Silicon Valley thinking break the treatment-resistant pain barrier?

For practitioners seeking non-invasive methods to help their patients after exhausting guidelines.



Silicon Valley thinking for cars is all about real-time observations and feedback for control. The SV quest to maintain Moore’s Law brings you ever faster, cheaper computers. You may know about IBM’s quantum computing that will someday take AI for medicine mainstream. Can your patients wait that long?

PhotoMed’s team thought, why not apply the same methods to solve chronic pain?



Can electronic sensors help solve intractable medical problems?

Thermal imaging shows the temperature of skin. Cold limbs form symptoms of many dreaded disorders. The imaging provides feedback to the algorithm’s operator.

Watch what the operator sees. Time is compressed: 15 minutes = 11 seconds.

 

Thermal imaging shows a man's hands warming in response to an application of therapy according to PhotoMed's algorithm. The operator observed warming and did not need to apply therapy a second time.

 

Robert (not his real name) waited 30 years for his uncomfortably cold hands to warm as did his friends. PhotoMed’s algorithm prompted his hand thermostat to reset to “comfortable”. Homeostasis kept them comfortable. What was the evidence for the return of homeostasis?

Figure 1  - Thermal imaging shows a warming response over a 10-minute period to a single stimulation by PhotoMed’s therapy. The body, not the therapy, determines the timing and magnitude of the return toward normal function. Lighter gray is warmer.

Figure 1 - Thermal imaging shows a warming response over a 10-minute period to a single stimulation by PhotoMed’s therapy. The body, not the therapy, determines the timing and magnitude of the return toward normal function. Lighter gray is warmer.

His hands remained comfortable for more than a year in the absence of therapy. Credit for maintaining benefit goes to the body and not the therapy.

The algorithm aims to restore innate functions; sensation, movement, thermoregulation, and to restart wound healing. Your patients can show you their functional improvements during the visit.

Caution: restoring sensation in feet lost to diabetes doesn’t affect the disease. Hopefully, your patient can safely get more exercise. Non-invasive physical therapy devices only prompt the body to do what it should have done before.

Does PhotoMed’s algorithm work for every type of pain or impairment?

Of course not.

But helping 1-in-3 real-world people is a whole lot better than zero. That’s where PhotoMed’s algorithm shines. (Pardon the pun.)

 
Figure 2  - PhotoMed’s algorithm works after previous attempt failed. A physiological response marks precisely when the body responds.

Figure 2 - PhotoMed’s algorithm works after previous attempt failed. A physiological response marks precisely when the body responds.

 

When the therapy doesn’t work, besides disappointment, there are no side effects.



Who can use the algorithm?

PhotoMed’s team of nerdy engineers developed the algorithm for pain specialists. To name a few; anesthesiologists, physiatrists, neurologists, and neuroscientists.

Today, it’s their operators who apply the algorithm using the Vari-Chrome® Pro.

Is the algorithm easy to learn?

The algorithm’s “try something different” logic is the same as for invasive interventions, but 1000x faster. Objective feedback, in seconds to minutes, lets the operator converge on relief for the individual patient.

Figure 3  - With single wavelength devices, there is only one wavelength to try and try again. With the  Vari-Chrome® Pro , the operator has 282 wavelengths to choose from. Pre-programmed settings can automatically vary the wavelength to efficiently find ones that work for the patient.

Figure 3 - With single wavelength devices, there is only one wavelength to try and try again. With the Vari-Chrome® Pro, the operator has 282 wavelengths to choose from. Pre-programmed settings can automatically vary the wavelength to efficiently find ones that work for the patient.

Want to record events that others think impossible?



Figure 2  - The  Instant Feedback System ™ enables small clinics to achieve outcomes previously thought impossible. Thermal imaging provides feedback for restoring normal skin temperatures. monochrome camera for documenting fresh exudates entering wounds, and a USB camera (not shown) for recording improving sensory and motor functions. Semi-automated questionnaires and narrative collection let the operator focus on the patient.

Figure 2 - The Instant Feedback System™ enables small clinics to achieve outcomes previously thought impossible. Thermal imaging provides feedback for restoring normal skin temperatures. monochrome camera for documenting fresh exudates entering wounds, and a USB camera (not shown) for recording improving sensory and motor functions. Semi-automated questionnaires and narrative collection let the operator focus on the patient.

 
 
 
 

Why didn’t someone think of this before?

For 150 years, practitioners used visible light to benefit their patients. Today, red and IR dominate.

Does the patient care which color prompted their relief or restored function?

 

PhotoMed’s team wondered, is it one, two, or a sequence of wavelengths needed by the body to resume homeostasis?

Silicon Valley’s quest for speed inspired PhotoMed’s therapy. Why not vary the wavelength during therapy?

Only the Vari-Chrome® Pro varies the wavelength during therapy.

 
 
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The Vari-Chrome® Pro and the Instant Feedback System™ are available for rent or sale.


More information?