FAQ - General

PhotoMed’s Instant Verification System™ records the steps taken to achieve success, or not. The modular tools automate data collection in case studies (N-of-1) in real time or intermittently over weeks and months.

What is “normal”?

This a challenging concept. We use the term “normal” for the functional state before an injury, frequently called homeostasis. For some, it is the absence of needing pain relief. For others, that state may not be achievable because an injury or stroke.

For example, Josephine had a brain-stem stroke which left her totally paralyzed. Therapy initially helped her to move her wrist and fingers after 14 years. Other impaired functions improved, but not to her pre-stroke abilities. Josephine’s initial response from no-function to limited-function provides clues for possible mechanisms. We use the steps and timing to achieve the first response as measures for developing the Triple 2 Algorithm.

What is the “return to normal function” response?

Practitioners of physical medicine frequently adjust their therapy based upon their minute-by-minute observations. They look for a response in an impaired function, usually a symptom. They may use multiple modalities during a visit to get the job done, like a carpenter uses different hammers.

From a physics perspective, the response marks the transition from an impaired state to the “normal” state that some call homeostasis. The response may complete in minutes (warming) or in the blink of an eye (realigning touch-maps). Longer times aren’t very useful for making during-visit adjustments to therapy.

Once started, the response appears to be entirely ordinary. Could its the unexpectedness make the event feel special?

Figure 1  - Depiction of the return to normal function after an injury. For people without chronic pain, the return typically occurs as part of the conclusion of the acute phase. For modeling purposes, the treatment-resistant pain experience (with no know cause for its presence) appears to be waiting for a signal to conclude. Real-time data and recording may help answer new questions.

Figure 1 - Depiction of the return to normal function after an injury. For people without chronic pain, the return typically occurs as part of the conclusion of the acute phase. For modeling purposes, the treatment-resistant pain experience (with no know cause for its presence) appears to be waiting for a signal to conclude. Real-time data and recording may help answer new questions.

 


Why take so much data?

As software engineers, we have a problem understanding the 0-10 pain scale. We’re not very good at understanding emotions. We like to replay curious events.

We’re more comfortable when success is measured by objective improvement in functions. For example, measuring improved sensations using von Frey monofilaments confirms the return of protective sensation.

Practitioners can now look for large effects that are objectively measurable. See the Restoration of Sensation and Neuroscience pages for interesting features of the responses to PhotoMed’s therapy.

 

Who says it works?

Development data was collected in real time at six independent sites. The practitioners were primarily pain specialists who recruited from their own practices. They also welcomed people with multiple impaired functions each of which were not expected to improve. Thus, the multiple responses from each volunteer contributed to the possible identification of associations among disorders.

Starting Assumptions

Could the definition of “it works” bias study designs and outcomes?

Could this question nibble at the disagreements among practitioners who aim to:

  • Manage pain with the required presence of an agent

  • Conclude the pain experience to end the need for the catalyzing agent?

 
Figure 2 -  PhotoMed’s team assumed that chronic pain and impairment will end during a visit.

Figure 2 - PhotoMed’s team assumed that chronic pain and impairment will end during a visit.


 

How frequently does it work?

For treatment-resistant pain and associated impairments, nothing happened in 2 out of 3 cases during development of PhotoMed’s therapy and Triple 2 Algorithm. The good news about the bad news; beyond disappointment, there were no side effects.

In the 1 in 3 cases, a physiological response typically became measurable within two minutes of an effective application of therapy. If no response, then the operator could try a different wavelength or other settings. It’s like testing medicines, but 1000x faster.

Therapy for inflammation takes a few minutes longer and to objectively measure outcomes. PhotoMed’s studies did not examine the effects of fixed wavelengths over several visits.

 

Does this therapy replace pain-masking medications or spinal cord stimulators?

No, if the intervention is working to relieve your pain.

Pain-masking interventions typically relieve acute pain by diminishing or blocking pain signals sent from the injured body part.

Of course, PhotoMed’s therapy might provide temporary relief. You must try it to find out.

Counter-intuitive, treatment-resistant pain appears to respond best when there is no known reason for its presence or magnitude. That is, there is no target to shoot or signals to block. This is where physical medicine using light, electricity, vibration, or magnetism frequently begins.

 

How does it work?

We don’t know. It’s just visible photons, not chemicals.

Perhaps brain imaging will unlock the secrets.

After Robert Florin M.D. (neurosurgeon) examined recordings of bilaterally improved skin temperature, he suggested that the warming and pain relief result from unblocking processes in the brain before the left-right split.

For example, the bilateral return of comfortable hand temperatures after 30 years.

 

Why should I want to have access to all wavelengths from the visible spectrum?

Would you feel comfortable throwing away wavelengths that might help your individual patient?




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