Treatment-resistant pain and impaired functions

 
 

Pain affects families and communities

Pain-masking medications and invasive interventions help millions get on with a quality life.

The grim statistics suggest that treatment-resistant pain will remain a long time.

Unfortunately, other millions do not respond as expected to existing technologies. They have no path forward because they are intentionally excluded from typical pain studies for lack of an expected response. Millions cannot work and depend upon their family & community to survive.

PhotoMed's team builds tools for practitioners of physical medicine who may wish to serve patients withtreatment-resistant pain.

 
 
From an NIH info-graphic illustrating the magnitude of chronic pain.

From an NIH info-graphic illustrating the magnitude of chronic pain.

 

 

PhotoMed's therapy addresses "treatment-resistant" pain having no known cause

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) declares, "Chronic pain is considered a disease itself... and is resistant to most medical treatments." Millions have tried almost everything on the market without relief.

PhotoMed team invented its non-invasive therapy to address treatment-resistant pain and functional impairments. Our team sponsored clinics and studies that welcomed people who were unexpected to improve. We wanted to know who might be helped by the therapy. Our team developed and evolved its Instant Verification System™ to record the steps taken to relieve pain, or not.

 
PhotoMed’s focus includes treatment-resistant pain. Pain that responds to medications or therapy typically does not appear to respond as vigorously to PhotoMed’s therapy.

PhotoMed’s focus includes treatment-resistant pain. Pain that responds to medications or therapy typically does not appear to respond as vigorously to PhotoMed’s therapy.


Different responses

Practitioners who tested the therapy reported several different responses to the therapy. Recorded data suggest types of the chronic pain or impairment that have their own response profiles.

Only some responses appear to complete the “back-to-normal” function.

Here’s a mix of findings:

  • Pain that was "managed" by pain-masking medications or invasive interventions could be eased but returned because the source of the pain signals continued to be active.

  • Slow-healing injuries were frequently accelerated by PhotoMed's non-invasive therapy.

  • A "non-responsive" type of pain responded with an abrupt response that we now call a return-toward-normal function. The improved sensory and/or motor functions continued long after therapy ended (15 years and counting). Looking at recordings, the pain continued after the injury appeared to heal completely. That is, there was no known cause for the presence and intensity of their pain.

  • Another “non-responsive” type of pain responded with temporarily reduced pain. Looking at recordings, this group of people reported only small improvements during the visit.

  • Post-surgical pain appears to masquerade as “phantom” pain with a loss of sensation, pain, and aversion to being touched. Scars and reconstructed skin responded by feeling more normal after PhotoMed’s therapy combined with cross-sensory stimulation.

Could the experience of pain be what’s stuck after healing has otherwise completed?

Could the responses be a function of homeostasis rather than the therapy?

It took years of testing for PhotoMed's team to achieve today's efficiency of the Vari-Chrome™ Pro. Personalizing therapy using different wavelengths appears to increase the likelihood of benefit to the patient. Improving functions, usually symptoms, provide feedback to the practitioner within seconds to minutes of an effective treatment.

Could homeostasis account for the all the crazy quick and large physiological responses AND the outcomes that persist after therapy ends?